Controversy has existed between the two largest denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement over some sections added to the 1876 LDS edition, attributed to founder Smith. Whereas the LDS Church believes these sections to have been revelations to Smith, [1] the RLDS Church traditionally disputed their authenticity. [2]

This distinction appears in Christianity in the New Testament , in which didaskalia means “basic teachings” (as in 1 and 2 Timothy), whereas dogma is used only in the sense of an official judgment or decree (as in Acts 16:4). Later, however, many theologians of the early church (including, for example, Origen , St. Cyril of Jerusalem , and St. Jerome ) use the term dogma in the sense of doctrine. In Eastern Christianity, the theologian St. John of Damascus popularized the term orthodoxy (literally “correct views”) to connote the sum of Christian truth. In Western Christianity, the great medieval theologian St. Thomas Aquinas chose the phrase “articles of faith” to denote those doctrines that are solemnly defined by the church and are considered to be obligatory for faith. As late as the Roman Catholic reformatory Council of Trent (1545–63), doctrine and dogma were still roughly synonymous.


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